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Rasmus Dengs Dengs itibaren Durchuna, Maharashtra, Hindistan itibaren Durchuna, Maharashtra, Hindistan

Okuyucu Rasmus Dengs Dengs itibaren Durchuna, Maharashtra, Hindistan

Rasmus Dengs Dengs itibaren Durchuna, Maharashtra, Hindistan

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Another goodie by Stephen King! Stay away from that darn room 217!

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Benjamin Franklin's autobiography is an insightful look into his character and many of his achievements, but it hits a wall at about the half-way mark and drags on towards an abrupt finish. The first half of the book is addressed to Franklin's son, and it contains information about Franklin's family, his humble upbringing, and his boot-strapping days as a young man seeking work in Philadelphia. The latter half of the book is targeted at a wider audience after it was suggested that Franklin publish his autobiography. The whimsical and inspirational personal tales from the book's first half are replaced with minute details about Franklin's career. Most unfortunate, though, is that Franklin never got around to actually completing the story of his life. There is nothing on the accounts of the American Revolution or the Constitutional Convention, the two things I was most interested in hearing Franklin's thoughts on. While not for everyone, those interested in history and philosophy will find it worthwhile to wade through the dull moments to uncover the gems of insight scattered throughout Franklin's autobiography.

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inished up the book, Life of Pi, last week and overall I really enjoyed it. The story is about a young boy whose family decides to emigrate from India to Canada. The family owned a zoo in India and because they were travelling with some of the animals that they sold to zoos in North America they travel on a cargo ship. Initially the voyage is uneventful, but eventually it sinks and the main character, Pi, barely manages to escape to a life boat. At the same time that Pi finds his refuge a large bengal tiger finds safety in the same boat. A few other animals make it to the boat as well but with the tiger on board the dinghys crew quickly shrinks back to two, Pi and the Tiger. The rest of the book is about the voyage and survival of both Pi and the Tiger. The entire voyage is quite remarkable and seems fairly unbelievable - much like the stories of religion. I only mention this parallel because as it turns out Pi is also a very spiritual boy who considers himself Hindu, Muslim, and Christian. While that trifecta may seem like a strange combination Pi's logic makes it all seem entirely reasonable. One of the marketing blurbs for the book says "..a story that will make you believe in God.." I don't know if the spiritual message is that strong but, at a minimum it does get you thinking. Something that few books have managed to do to me in a long time. The book is pretty short, written in the first person (generally), and overall was an excellent tale. I give it a thumbs up

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During the 1980s, I admit I jumped on the Asian-Americans-Who-Hate-Amy-Tan bandwagon. But after reading her memoir, I hold her less accountable to the Asian American writer standard. Why should she represent? Her job as a writer is to tell a good story with believable characters. Her books reflect her specific experience as a daughter of Chinese immigrants. It's not under her control how the public including book critics, place her books within the American canon. It's not her fault how publishers will compare every hopeful Asian American writer to her or how they are looking for the next "Amy Tan-like" best-seller by publishing pale carbon copies of her stories. I like how she describes her mother Daisy. A remarkable woman who still held on to her traditional beliefs despite living a thoroughly modern life.