hamrakhan

Hamra Khan Khan itibaren Mamdapur, Maharashtra 444903, Hindistan itibaren Mamdapur, Maharashtra 444903, Hindistan

Okuyucu Hamra Khan Khan itibaren Mamdapur, Maharashtra 444903, Hindistan

Hamra Khan Khan itibaren Mamdapur, Maharashtra 444903, Hindistan

hamrakhan

I love that reading for Harper let's me explore outside my usual fiction rules. I don't read a ton of memoirs but was very intrigued by Colby Buzzell's Lost in America: A Dead-End Journey. The Iraq war vet who had recently lost his mother and had his first child (the former gets a lot more discussion in the text), sets out with the instruction to live a modern-day On The Road. With a few interruptions, he travels in an old car, focusing on towns tourists tend to skip, back-roads, and less-than-savory motels. He has a clear interest in the underbelly world...by that, I mean more the very working-class, simple folks that people often overlook (and who have been hit hard by the economy). Usually, he mentions but doesn't encounter a heavy-duty criminal element. This was a quick read. And I enjoyed it at times. I usually note I need to find characters interesting, but not necessarily likeable. Maybe this just doesn't translate for memoirs because not being a fan of the author, who plows through too much liquor and is ignoring the fact that he has a wife and son, really impacts me in this case. I'd normally feel reticent to say that...I'm guilt-prone and don't want to insult...but I don't think Buzzell would care. I also think he tends to gloss over the fact that he ISN'T just one of the "trying to make ends meet" types he pals around with...he has a book deal, an existing writing career, and is able to fly away a couple times during the journey (with really no note about how incongruous this is to his "I'm one of them" style). It is an easy read and part of me did have fun with it, but I'm stuck at 3 stars for the taste it left behind.

hamrakhan

I absolutely loved this book. I know the narrative confused some people because the sequence of events isn't in a straight line, but the book is captivating and fascinating and had me on the edge of my seat. You can never go wrong with a good love story and yes, this one is a bit sad. I loved it and will definitely read this one again and again. Highly recommend this to anyone who hasn't read it.

hamrakhan

Thank you thank you thank you! After reading a few let downs this book was refreshing and delightful. The world which is created in this story and the creativity is awesome. After reading the book you truly sympathize for the witch and it allows you to see her from a competely different spectrum. Great book, must read!

hamrakhan

I first read this book in March 1997 when it was first published and it was one of my favorite books ever. It brings the Oregon Trail to life and puts faces on the countless brave pioneers who braved the hardships of the trail to make new lives in the west. The narrator is a fictional thirteen-year-old farm girl from Missouri, Hattie Campbell. Through her diary, written in a voice that truly sounds as if it belongs to a young girl from that time, the reader experiances the events of Hattie's journey west - her friendship with Pepper, a fourteen-year-old girl from the wagon train, the beginnings of a romance with Pepper's brother Wade, and many others. Hattie was a character that I really came to care about, and I was sad to put the book down when it was finished, but since then, I have read it several more times. Kristiana Gregory is an amazing author that has given a distinct voice to each of her narrators in this book and her other Dear America books. Overall one of my top favorite Dear America books.

hamrakhan

LOVE this book. It is awesome. The characters are well developed and at least the main characters are likable. It's a well written story that really has you turning the pages. Everyone one I know who'd read this one says the same thing - you just don't want to put it down. If you haven't read it already, I highly recommend it.