a5132833597557

XIAO Chufeng Chufeng itibaren Nglinggi, South Klaten, Klaten Regency, Central Java, Endonezya itibaren Nglinggi, South Klaten, Klaten Regency, Central Java, Endonezya

Okuyucu XIAO Chufeng Chufeng itibaren Nglinggi, South Klaten, Klaten Regency, Central Java, Endonezya

XIAO Chufeng Chufeng itibaren Nglinggi, South Klaten, Klaten Regency, Central Java, Endonezya

a5132833597557

Merton's translations breathe life into this Daoist classic. If that's your thing, this is a must read.

a5132833597557

A traditional Maori Legend. I always felt so sorry for the sun in this story. The sun just moved so fast cause he had so much energy, but the Maori weren't happy with the gift of light and warmth that it was providing and were selfish and decided that they had to bully the sun into slowing down and giving them what they wanted, more daylight to fish by and steal from the sea by. So they made long ropes out of flax and sharpened stones and attached them to sticks as weapons and then they crept up on the sun and ensnared him and then beat him until the sun succumbed to the Maori and did what they told him to. Until the sun was a slave to the maori. This is my interpretation of the story. I do wonder what the moral of this story is and what exactly maori were trying to teach by relating this story to others...? That if there's something you don't like or want to change that taking it with force and violence is appropriate? Or perhaps to fear what others might do to you so give up willingly when first asked? Or perhaps it is just to portray the hero Maui? Which I don't buy because there are always morals to these kinds of tales and secondly because to consider someone a hero they must possess a quality you would desire for yourself or the person you are telling the story to. Anyway, not sure. All i know is this is an entertaining story. But possibly questionable as a children's story.