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Ilya Grudin Grudin itibaren Kramatmulya, Kuningan Regency, West Java, Endonezya itibaren Kramatmulya, Kuningan Regency, West Java, Endonezya

Okuyucu Ilya Grudin Grudin itibaren Kramatmulya, Kuningan Regency, West Java, Endonezya

Ilya Grudin Grudin itibaren Kramatmulya, Kuningan Regency, West Java, Endonezya

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Unutmayın, bu hikaye için deli oluyordum. Bu kitaptaki son, filmden daha trajik. ama bu hikayedeki entrikaları gerçekten çok seviyorum. Chiung Yao iyidir ^^

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this is a little better than a typical romance novel but still it is much too light for my taste.

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The Reader flew by – even with weighty subject matter and lots of thought-provoking, it felt almost…slight? Perhaps part of the problem was having seen the recent film version (with Kate Winslet in her Oscar-winning role), which hewed extremely closely to the book, both in plot and structure. I neither particularly loved nor disliked the film, but I do wonder what I would have thought of the book had I read it before (or instead of) seeing the movie. It was certainly thought-provoking and sad – perhaps melancholy is a better word – and perhaps if I didn’t know everything ahead of time I would have been more intellectually engaged by the Big Ideas in the book. As it was, I felt like I was almost skimming this book: enjoying it, but not really engaging with the hugely loaded ideas about collective guilt, forgiveness, memory, authority, power, etc etc. It could also be that Bernhard Schlink packed these (and other) big ideas too tightly into this smallish book. As interesting and provocative as the ideas were, the book might have just been overloaded. Yet my hat is off to Schlink for creating such a philosophically dense novel that still functioned as a readable (not to say “fun”) book. Many of the ideas and complex characterizations that were hard to convey in the movie – and were often simply alluded to by impassive acting choices – naturally found more full expressions on the page. Being taken inside the mind of the protagonist helped color some of the things which felt flat and emotionless in the film. Reading a book in translation always feels at least somewhat chancy to me. Who knows what nuance and cultural understandings we miss when we read something put through the ringer and squeezed out of one language into another? I thought the actual writing – the actual translation – was excellently readable. But I still wonder what I missed on the cultural level in a book about postwar Germany, dealing with the horrors of the Nazi regime, written by a German, intended for a primarily German audience. There is surely something an American cannot understand about the kind of grappling being done by the characters in the story, as well the postwar German society as a whole. Regardless, I enjoyed the book and found myself really challenges by some of the concepts that were thrown at me; it was undeniably absorbing. There were, however, a lot of extra-textual distractions (celluloid, cultural, etc) that probably didn’t do me any favors in reading it.