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Verona Estigarribia Estigarribia itibaren Sevrei, Moğolistan itibaren Sevrei, Moğolistan

Okuyucu Verona Estigarribia Estigarribia itibaren Sevrei, Moğolistan

Verona Estigarribia Estigarribia itibaren Sevrei, Moğolistan

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After a long "teaser campaign" to build excitement about Mayor Emanuel's pick for the fall 2011 "One Book, One Chicago" the announcement was made: Saul Bellow’s The Adventures of Augie March. I’ve only read one book by Saul Bellow, Seize the Day. I didn’t like the main character. I wanted to shake him and yell “Stop whining. Nobody cares. Get a job and sort your life out.” But I’ll try to approach this one with an open mind. I’m on currently on page 9. My initial reactions are the detailed descriptions, dense vocabulary, and narrow margins. This is not going to be a quick read- or an easy sell to my library branch’s patron base.

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Disgusted by too many mediocre restaurant meals, Cathy Erway decided to stop eating out and blogged about it under the title Not Eating Out in New York. She discussed recipes, discoveries, and chronicled how much money she saved by preparing all of her own meals. Now she’s written a book about the experience, and it’s a fun memoir by an adventurous cook, full of cooking fests, food, friends, and fierce felines. Even if you don’t decide to duplicate Erway’s experiment, you might come away from this book with a few good recipes or an itch to cook at home a little more often. If you like this book, try Julie and Julia by Julie Powell or The Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan.

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I never thought I would like a book about zombies, but this was a great introduction to the genre! it's like a regular history book except the bad guys are zombies. and now they're making a movie out it with brad pitt! my fav quotes: Because Americans worship technology. It's an inherent trait in the national zeitgeist. Whether we realize it or not, even the most indefatigable Luddite can't deny our country's technoprowess. We split the atom, we reached the moon, we've filled every household and business with more gadgets and gizmos than early sci-fi writers could have ever dreamed of. I don't know if that's a good thing, I'm in no place to judge. But I do know that just like all those ex-atheists in foxholes, most Americans were still praying for the God of science to save them. p 166 Lies are neither bad nor good. Like a fire they can either keep you warm or burn you to death, depending on how they're used. p 166 Tomonaga: So I explained that, like any garden, Japan could not be allowed to wither and die. We would care for her, we would preserve her, we would annihilate the walking blight that infested and defiled her and we would restore her beauty and purity for the day when her children would return to her. Kondo: I thought he was insane, and told him so right to his face. The two of us against millions of siafu? Tomonaga: I handed his sword back to him; it's weight and balance felt familiar to the touch. I told him that we might be facing fifty million monsters, but those monsters would be facing the gods. p 227